Saturday, July 23, 2016

Baker School in Grundy County Celebrates Milestone Anniversary


Baker School is one of three buildings that compose the Grundy County Museum campus in Trenton Mo.  This unimposing building stands alone as it represents all the 90 one-room schools that previously dotted Grundy County.  Baker School, the last one-room school to close in 1966, was relocated to its present location, 11th and Tinsman Avenue, in 1996 where it can be enjoyed and experienced by many people.

Baker School was named for Christian Baker, who came to Grundy County in 1862 and gave the land for the school.  Gladys McCarty was the first teacher in 1918 and Letha McClure was the last teacher in 1964.  The building was donated to the museum by Vern and Marian VanHoozer. John Rice, museum board member, chaired the School House Committee and coordinated the $12,334.00 budget to relocate the building. 

Moving Baker School was a challenging project.  Trickel Construction Company and Hinnen Hauling combined to move the building and place it on a new foundation.  The 9th Street bridge, a formidable obstacle, required the building to be cut in half for transport and then reassembled at the new location.  It was an interesting operation and a crowd assembled to see it pass over and through the 9th Street Bridge with inches of clearance.

Most people know someone who attended a one-room school, but don’t feel sorry for them because they “turned out” fine regardless of the lack of today’s typical school programs.  It was a different time and a different experience.   Contrary to the stories about walking five miles through snow….and it was up-hill both ways, most students didn’t travel more than a mile. 

·        The teacher taught grades 1-8 without a teaching helper, a principal, guidance counselor or custodian.

·        There was no cafeteria - everyone brought their own lunch.

·        There was no bussing program and everyone got there on their own.

·        There was no gym or athletic program.

·        The Library usually consisted of about 25 reference books.

·        The school was also community meeting place where plays and social events were held, for example, the Box Suppers.

·        Chalkboards and individual slates were used rather than computers and iPads.

·        The restroom was usually an outhouse separated from the school building.

Today, Baker School looks just like it did in 1996 however there are a few subtle changes, the building is air conditioned and you won’t have to bring in a scuttle of coal for the pot-bellied stove where the teacher sometimes cooked a kettle of soup for everyone.  It is a fun place to visit and learn about all the 90 one-room schools in Grundy County.  Serving as a repository of information about all the schools, you can read newspaper stories and see pictures of those schools and many of the students and teachers.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Greene County Extension and Springfield Cardinals, together for one night only!


As a Friend of Greene County Extension you are invited to join Greene County Extension Council members and local MU Extension staff at the Springfield Cardinals field for a baseball game and fireworks on August 26.

We have a limited number (50) of seats available. These are dugout seats and we are making them available for $10 a ticket. By joining us in the fun you will also receive a Springfield Cardinals baseball cap (free-of-charge) and you have the option of purchasing a black MU Extension t-shirt for $10 (while supplies last). Visit or call our office to claim your tickets (before Aug. 11) and join our group for a fun evening on Aug. 26.

Saturday, July 02, 2016

Financial Issues and Stress in Farm Communities Topics of Meeting July 11 in Springfield

Contact: Wesley Tucker, agriculture business specialist
Headquartered in Polk County
Tel: (417) 326-4916
E-mail: tuckerw@missouri.edu

BOLIVAR, Mo. –  Financial issues and stress in farm communities at the topics of a  public meeting held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., July 11 at the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center, 6821 West Independence (Exit 70 off of I-44), Springfield, Mo.

“The purpose of the meeting is to gather information rather than just tell economic outlooks,” said Wesley Tucker, ag business specialist with University of Missouri Extension.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture and MU Extension are joining in talks this summer with agricultural stakeholders. Farmers, agribusiness leaders and farm organization members are urged to attend the free meeting.

Volatile prices for crops, livestock, and inputs can hurt farm income and rural communities.  Information gathered can inform local leaders and guide educational and follow-up action.

The meeting agenda will open with statements from leaders with the Missouri Department of Agriculture and MU Extension. The main part of the meeting will be a locally selected panel of farmers, agribusinesses, organizations and state and federal agencies.  Participants will be asked “What are the next steps.”

Regional weather impacts will also be discussed as the season has started with volatile weather patterns.  Topics include declining crop and livestock prices, lower land values, and broad-issue impacts on local areas.

“The overriding issue will be the financial stresses in rural economies. Participants will be asked to address risk management help needed,” said Tucker.

To register to attend please call 417-326-4916 or email polkco@missouri.edu.
###

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Current Table of Contents for the "Missouri Directory of Historic and One-Room Schools"

The "Missouri Directory of Historic and One-Room Schools" is a project of the Missouri Historic Schools Alliance and is being authored by David Burton. The directory highlights the very best historic and one-room schools in Missouri as a historic resource and as a tool for developing heritage tourism around these existing historic schools.

Individuals are invited to submit information to include a school in this directory. For information on how to submit a school for the directory read this blog entry.

Here is the current Table of Contents for the book which includes the lists that are listed.

Northwest Missouri Schools
Baker School (Trenton)
Banneker School (Parkville)
Franklin Academy (Lawson)
Hicklin School (Lexington)
Hickory Grove School (Maryville)
Hudson School (Appleton City)
Mt. Gilead School (Kearney)
Nyhart School (Butler) - more information needed
Pony School (St. Joseph)
Rockford School (Harrisonville) - pictures needed
South Gale School (Smithville)
Swain School (Chillicothe)
Walnut Grove School (Lathrop)


Northeast Missouri Schools
Ballwin School (Ballwin)
Florida School (Florida)
Friendship School (St. James)- more information needed
Indian Prairie (Union)- more information needed
Lincoln School (Canton)
Mount Hope (Defiance)
Oak Hill (Hannibal)- more information needed
Rolling Heath School (Ft. Leonard Wood)
Salem School (St. Clair)
Salt River (Hannibal)- more information needed
Saverton School (Saverton) - more information needed
Stone School (Hannibal)
Old Pond School (Wildwood)


Central Missouri Schools
Audrain County School (Mexico)
Elm School (Warrensburg)
Harper School (Harper)
Mt. Sterling School (Mt. Sterling)
Newcomer School (Columbia)
New Lebanon School (New Lebanon)
Pleasant View School (Medford)- more information needed



Southwest Missouri Schools   
1872 Neosho Colored School (Neosho)
1905 School (Springfield)
Bellview (Springfield)
Black School (Cassville)
Boston Center School (Branson)
Bruner (Douglas County)
Bunker Hill (Pineville)- more information needed
Carver School (Neosho)
Cave Springs (Cave Springs)
Chapman (Pierce City)
Cresent (Buffalo)
Dry Valley School (Sarcoxie)
Elmira (Red Oak)- more information needed
Enterprise (Saddlebrook)
Flint Hill (Willard)
Greenwood School (Marshfield)
Kings Prairie School (Monett)
Liberty School (Springfield)
Little Country School (Seneca)
Little Moore School (Lawrenceburg)
Locust Prairie (Fair Grove)
Mt. Pleasant School (Ozark)- more information needed
New Bethel School (Anderson)
Newton County School (Neosho)
Newport School (Lamar)- more information needed
North Star School (Strafford)- more information needed
Northward (Bolivar)
Phelps (Halltown)
Oak Trail School (Silver Dollar City)
Rocky Point School (Marshfield)
Schuyler School (Springfield)
Shiloh School (Liberal)
St. Elmo (Republic)
Star School (Point Lookout)
Sycamore School (Marionville)
Willey School (Willard)
Wooley Creek (Cape Fair)


Southeast Missouri Schools
Alice School (Cabool)
Higgerson School (New Madrid)
Kage School (Cape Gireadeu)
Plunk School (Doniphan)
Stephens School (Marquand)
Story’s Creek School (Alley Spring)
Texas County Schools (Assorted)





Current Table of Contents for the "Missouri Directory of Historic and One-Room Schools"

The "Missouri Directory of Historic and One-Room Schools" is a project of the Missouri Historic Schools Alliance and is being authored by David Burton. The directory highlights the very best historic and one-room schools in Missouri as a historic resource and as a tool for developing heritage tourism around these existing historic schools.

Indivduals are invited to submit information to include a school in this directory. For information on how to submit a school for the directory read this blog entry.

Here is the current Table of Contents for the book which includes the lists that are listed.

Northwest Missouri Schools
Baker School (Trenton)
Banneker School (Parkville)
Franklin Academy (Lawson)
Hicklin School (Lexington)
Hickory Grove School (Maryville)
Hudson School (Appleton City)
Mt. Gilead School (Kearney)
Nyhart School (Butler) - more information needed
Pony School (St. Joseph)
Rockford School (Harrisonville) - pictures needed
South Gale School (Smithville)
Swain School (Chillicothe)
Walnut Grove School (Lathrop)

Northeast Missouri Schools

Ballwin School (Ballwin)
Florida School (Florida)
Friendship School (St. James)- more information needed
Indian Prairie (Union)- more information needed
Lincoln School (Canton)
Mount Hope (Defiance)
Oak Hill (Hannibal)- more information needed
Rolling Heath School (Ft. Leonard Wood)
Salem School (St. Clair)
Salt River (Hannibal)- more information needed
Saverton School (Saverton) - more information needed
Stone School (Hannibal)
Old Pond School (Wildwood)

Central Missouri Schools

Audrain County School (Mexico)
Elm School (Warrensburg)
Harper School (Harper)
Mt. Sterling School (Mt. Sterling)
Newcomer School (Columbia)
New Lebanon School (New Lebanon)
Pleasant View School (Medford)- more information needed

Southwest Missouri Schools   


1872 Neosho Colored School (Neosho)
1905 School (Springfield)
Bellview (Springfield)
Black School (Cassville)
Boston Center School (Branson)
Bruner (Douglas County)
Bunker Hill (Pineville)- more information needed
Carver School (Neosho)
Cave Springs (Cave Springs)
Chapman (Pierce City)
Cresent (Buffalo)
Dry Valley School (Sarcoxie)
Elmira (Red Oak)- more information needed
Enterprise (Saddlebrook)
Flint Hill (Willard)
Greenwood School (Marshfield)
Kings Prairie School (Monett)
Liberty School (Springfield)
Little Country School (Seneca)
Little Moore School (Lawrenceburg)
Locust Prairie (Fair Grove)
Mt. Pleasant School (Ozark)- more information needed
New Bethel School (Anderson)
Newton County School (Neosho)
Newport School (Lamar)- more information needed
North Star School (Strafford)- more information needed
Northward (Bolivar)
Phelps (Halltown)
Oak Trail School (Silver Dollar City)
Rocky Point School (Marshfield)
Schuyler School (Springfield)
Shiloh School (Liberal)
St. Elmo (Republic)
Star School (Point Lookout)
Sycamore School (Marionville)
Willey School (Willard)
Wooley Creek (Cape Fair)
Southeast Missouri Schools

Alice School (Cabool)
Higgerson School (New Madrid)
Kage School (Cape Gireadeu)
Plunk School (Doniphan)
Stephens School (Marquand)
Story’s Creek School (Alley Spring)
Texas County Schools (Assorted)





Details on Submitting to the Missouri Director of Historic and One-Room Schools


Many volunteer historians and historic societies across Missouri have created books that document the last remaining one-room schools in their county. In fact, I wrote one for Greene County back in 2001 (link to book here). Those are exhaustive reports on all the former school buildings in those counties.

But a statewide resources is on the horizon. A book I am creating and writing as part of the Missouri Historic Schools Alliance that will highlight the very best examples from around the state. Close to 90% of the listings in the book will feature historic schools that are fully restored and either open to the public or available for a public use. The exception is made for those schools on the National Register that are not restored or those that are in the process of being restored.


This book has been in the works for about three years and has received statewide coverage. I have encouraged groups to submit their own information and photos. The hope is that directory can be used to help promote rural hertiage tourism to individuals nationwide that are interested in historic schools (and there are many). We are also working on bringing the national historic schools conference back to Missouri and to re-launch a statewide conference as well.

This book is going to be updated on a regular basis as part of the Missouri Historic Schools Alliance.
Here the current Table of Contents for the book which shows the schools listed.

There is no cost for being listed. However, we also ask that all listed schools submit photos and required information for this publication. Provide written answers to the following questions:


· Name of school, location or address (as much detail as possible)

· current owner or contact

· current use (mention if it is publicly or privately owned)

· history of building

· explain how the school was or is being preserved

· why the school was preserved

· where information can be found online

· contact information for the group or individual that owns or operates the school

· and personal stories about the history of the school and building.


Please also include some interior and exterior photos of the school. Written answers and photos can be submitted by email or by using this mailing address:

David Burton

Greene County Extension, 2400 S. Scenic Ave, Springfield, Mo. 65807

Telephone: 417-881-8909 * Email: burtond@missouri.edu




Friday, June 17, 2016

Big Three: Well plugging, Radon and Mold


Q: I read a past article about plugging wells and really needed to talk with someone to better understand his available options.
R.W., Miller, Mo.

A: After talking on the phone I now understand that you have several concerns including radon testing, mold under the house AND well plugging. We talked by phone and I hope these additional links will help you resolve these problems.

Well Plugging Instructions
http://www.dnr.mo.gov/pubs/pub2281.pdf


Cost-share assistance that may be available through your county SWCD Office
http://swcd.mo.gov/lawrence/index.html


Affidavit that is filed with MoDNR after the well is filled
http://dnr.mo.gov/forms/780-1603-f.pdf

Mold control
http://extension.missouri.edu/webster/mold-control.aspx

Curtain drain (if subsurface water from uphill or flat slopes is pooling water under the building, a curtain drain located upslope of the building can divert it)
http://extension.missouri.edu/p/EQ401#drains

Radon test kit (DHSS) or call 573-751-6102
http://health.mo.gov/living/environment/radon/ and http://health.mo.gov/living/environment/radon/homebuyers.php


Radon: An Indoor Health Hazard?
http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G1968

Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix Your Home
https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-02/documents/2013_consumers_guide_to_radon_reduction.pdf


Bob Schultheis
Natural Resource Engineering Specialist / CPD
University of Missouri Extension Center - Webster County
800 S. Marshall St., Marshfield, MO 65706
Phone:  417-859-2044
E-mail: schultheisr@missouri.edu

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Solutions for Dealing with White Flies in School Greenhouse

Q: Our school greenhouse has an infestation of white flies that are destroying all of our green peppers and cucumbers. The school even had an exterminator a few months ago who came and sprayed. It decreased the number for a while but they are now back in full force. How to rid school greenhouse of white flies?
A.B., Nixa, Mo.

A: White fly control is a challenge in greenhouses, and requires an integrated approach.  The publications at http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G7275 and https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef456 are good.  Basically, here is the approach:

1.            try to keep the pest from entering the greenhouse - closely examine all plants that are brought into the greenhouse, discard heavily infested plants.
2.            monitor the greenhouse with sticky yellow cards, on a daily basis if possible.  When a threshold of around 0.5-2 insects per card per day are noted, a spray is applied. Cards are available from http://m.gemplers.com/search/sticky+yellow+cards and elsewhere.
3.            The attached publications lists effective sprays for this pest.  Sprays must be alternated as this pest is at high risk of developing insecticide resistance.

Patrick Byers
Regional Horticulture Specialist
MU Extension - Greene County
417-881-8909




Mystery Weed in Garden Turns out to be Dreaded Pigroot


Q: Attached are pictures of a weed that I have been battling for the past few years in my garden.  It only occurs in my gardens, both vegetable and flower.  It appears where I break up ground where grass once was.  I need help in identifying it and how to control it or get rid of it completely. I use newspaper and mulch or straw to help control the weeds in my garden and that helps for those spots, but this weeds grows anywhere that is not covered. Because I rotate crops and move things around from year to year, the weed will reappear the following year on uncovered and unmulched ground. Can you help me with this?


C.L.
Republic

A: This is a weed called Red-Root Pigweed.  Red-root pigweed is a major weed problem in much of the area, especially in agricultural production because of its resistance to glyphosate.  Also, one plant can produce up to a million seeds which can build up in soil and be a problem for years to come. 

Once pigweed is established in an area it can be very difficult to control.  Hand pulling or using a cultivation tool when the plants are small and applying a pre-emergent herbicide listed for broadleaf weeds can be the most effective for homeowners. 

Here is a link about pigweed and plant relatives of pigweed: http://ipm.missouri.edu/MEG/2010/11/Worst-Weeds-2010/

Kelly McGowan
Horticulture Educator
University of Missouri Extension; Greene County; Southwest Region




Question about Lead in Private Well / Water Supply


Q: I had a water test done on a private well. The results say that public water needs to have a lead level of 5 or less and that 15 is unsafe. Is there a different standard for private wells and her client’s well tested at 10? What does that mean and is it a concern?

Answered by Bob Schultheis, natural resource engineering specialist with University of Missouri Extension (his contact info here).

A: The MCLG (maximum contamination level goal) for lead is zero, and the MCL (maximum contamination level) is 15 ppb, above which is considered unsafe. I’ve not found any reference that differentiates the MCL for public vs. private wells. Testing before and after the “first flush” of the faucet will help determine if the lead problem is in the groundwater or in the plumbing. If the well tested at 10 ppb, no action is needed, but if they want to play it extra safe and the problem is in the plumbing, they can run the cold water faucet 1-2 minutes before using the water for drinking or cooking. It doesn’t hurt to bathe in lead-tainted water.

The following links may be helpful.

Basic Information about Lead in Drinking Water (EPA)


Lead in Tap Water (CDC)


Water Tests: What Do the Numbers Mean? (Penn State University)



Monday, June 13, 2016

Story on Haircoats on Cattle Gains International Question

Dear David,
I was very interested in an article I found posted on Facebook about haircoats on cattle (see original article here). So much so that I would like to use your scoring system for coat shedding to at least find  out whether it would work for us. We have an Angus stud herd in Tasmania (Australia's Island State) and obviously the months for observing will be different. I have a couple of questions, firstly when do you recommend that the score be given. I think from the article June would be a good month which would equate with December here. The other question is would this scoring system work for selecting young stock to keep as breeders or is it meant for adult cows. We calve in late winter early spring (mid July to mid September at the very latest) and make our selections for keepers bout now (late autumn early winter). It would be hard to judge these animals as calves but possibly the system could be used when they are yearlings. What it would mean is delaying a final selection until later on. Anyway to start with I would probably just make note a score and then see if there was a difference later on.

Regards,
Brian Stewart
Dunlop Park Angus Stud
4938 Frankford Main Road, Thirlstane, Tasmania 7307
Australia



Dear Brian,

The leader on this hair shedding project is Jared Decker, extension genomics specialist at the University of Missouri, Columbia.  His email is deckerje@missouri.edu  He may give you more details than I could.

From my perspective in the southwest part of Missouri where fescue is the dominant forage and we run lots of cattle the failure to shed hair is a problem.  The various ergot alkaloids contribute to the genetic problem of shedding and it all culminates in cattle that gain poorly and reproduction is compromised.

We’ve done some form of hair evaluation since the early 90’s and feel it’s valuable to try and select early shedders.  Late shedders obviously appear stressed when the temperatures exceed 80 degrees.

Dr. Decker will be doing a 3-year study to determine more about the gene makeup of cattle across the U.S. and their adaptability to the environment in which they’re raised.  Why he might even be interested in observations.  I’m sure your Angus cattle have some of the same breeding in them that we have in ours.  The folks who show their cattle like those that have lots of hair as it allows them to hid some little imperfections with good grooming.

I would argue though that long hair and slow shedding is not desirable under our warm, fescue-based conditions.

Let me know if you have other thoughts or questions and please try to contact Dr. Decker.

Eldon Cole
Livestock specialist
University of Missouri Extension

May and June Good Months to Study Haircoats on Cattle

Contact: Eldon Cole, livestock specialist
Headquartered in Lawrence County
Tel: (417) 466-3102
E-mail: colee@missouri.edu

MT. VERNON, Mo. -- May and June are good months to evaluate the hair shedding nature of cattle according to Eldon Cole, livestock specialist, University of Missouri Extension.

“Research at several institutions reveal that early shedding cows tend to be more productive regarding weaning weight of their calves.  Weight differences of 20 or more pounds favored the early shedders,” said Cole.

EARLY MU RESEARCH

University of Missouri researchers began scoring cows and yearlings for shedding ability and hair growth in 1992 at the Southwest Research Center.  The cattle in the studies were grazing fescue that contained the toxin producing endophyte. 

Studies dealt with shade, mineral supplementation and clean well water versus dirty pond water that had cattle traffic in it.

“In those early years, we suspected there could be genetic implications that caused some wooly cattle to perform poorly but no serious selection pressure was applied toward the early shedders,” said Cole.

In fact, most of the early effort was directed toward selecting novel or friendly endophytes in the development of non-toxic fescue instead of selecting adaptable cattle.

GENETICS MATTER NOW

We now are at the point where both cow-calf producers and seedstock raisers observe hair shedding more seriously. 

“Genomic studies are being used to evaluate the heritability of haircoat retention.  An important feature is to score haircoats of cattle about this time of the year,” said Cole.

Getting rid of the winter haircoat begins in southwest Missouri around early April.  However, some animals still appear to have all their hair in June.

“These late, or never shedders, are the ones that suffer and are more likely to wean lightweight calves and have lower calving rates,” said Cole.

SHEDDING SCORES

Many factors influence shedding such as breed, individual genetic makeup, nutrition, forage, day length, temperature, and humidity.

“In the early 1990’s at the Southwest Research Center, we scored the cattle on a one to four scale for shedding and evidence of fescue sensitivity.  The scoring system has now been adjusted to a one to five range.  The one score is an animal that is completely shed off from front to rear and top to bottom.  I usually refer to them as ‘slick as a mole’,” said Cole.

The 2’s are mostly shed off, 75 percent or so, and most of the long hair will be on the lower part of the body.  A three score is about 50 percent shed; a four is only 25 percent shed most of which is in the neck, shoulder region and down the back.  The 5’s still has its winter coat with no evidence of shedding.

“If you have the 5’s in the chute, you can try to pull hair out, and it is firmly attached,” said Cole.

The scoring system is subjective. However, if the same person does the scoring in their herd, it gives a producer a good idea of cattle that could give more problems from “hot” fescue and heat stress as we move into the summer. 

According to Cole, some of the 4’s and 5’s that are stressed will benefit from clipping.

“The individual scoring of cattle may even result in farmers realizing that late shedding is more of a problem than first thought,” said Cole.

MORE INFORMATION

For more information, contact any of the MU Extension livestock specialists in southwest Missouri: Eldon Cole in Lawrence County, (417) 466-3102; Andy McCorkill in Dallas County at (417) 345-7551; Dr. Randy Wiedmeier, in Howell County at (417) 256-2391; or Dr. Patrick Davis in Cedar County at (417) 276-3313.

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Tuesday, June 07, 2016

June 10 Pasture Walk at Turners Heifer Haven Near Hartville

Contact: Ted Probert, dairy specialist
Headquartered in Wright County
Tel: (417) 547-7545
E-mail: probertt@missouri.edu

MOUNTAIN GROVE, Mo. –  The June meeting of South-Central Dairy Grazers wil begin with a pasture walk at 11 a.m. on June 10 at Denis and Lynn Turner’s farm west of Hartville.  

“Denis had just established several acres of Estancia novel endophyte fescue when we last visited the farm in October of 2015,” said Dr. Ted Probert, dairy specialist with University of Missouri Extension. “These seedlings are up and going, and we will have an opportunity to see how they are faring through the early part of the grazing season.”

A chronic problem on many pasture-based dairies is lane maintenance.  The Turners have made several lane renovations that will be discussed during the tour.

Traditionally the Turners have harvested all forage growth through grazing.  The last couple of years the strategy has changed and now several fields are harvested either as baleage or dry hay during the spring growth flush.

“I think you will find the results of this practice interesting regarding the quality feed stored through baling, the increase in feed harvested and the condition of pastures following harvest of excess growth,” said Probert.

Directions to the Turner’s Farm: Take Hwy 38 west of Hartville about 10 miles. Tour begins at the Turners Special Supply warehouse on the south side of the road.   

Call the Wright County Extension Center at (417) 547-7545 for more information.
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Monday, June 06, 2016

Women in Dairy Workshop June 13 in Mtn. Grove Focuses on Relieving Everyday Stress

Contact: Reagan Bluel, dairy specialist
Headquartered in Barry County
Tel: (417)  847-3161
E-mail: BluelRJ@missouri.edu

MTN. GROVE, Mo. –Schedule the opportunity to lunch and learn at University of Missouri Extension’s “Women in Dairy” program scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., June 13 at the Missouri State University Fruit Experiment Station, 9740 Red Spring Road, Mountain Grove.

The program is designed to help dairy ladies learn how to best take time for themselves for the betterment of the farm.

“When people’s lives get really busy and stressed, or something traumatic happens, it can affect both physical and mental health” said MU Extension Human Development Specialist Angie Fletcher. “Virtually everyone suffers from stress.”

“The Taking Care of You” program provides practical strategies to help people manage stress in healthy ways so they are better able to take care of themselves and maintain their overall health.

“Women in the dairy industry are amazing jugglers. Whether it is a sick cow, employee problems, or family demands, there’s always something” said Reagan Bluel, dairy specialist with MU Extension.

Whatever the sources of stress in your life University of Missouri Extension delivers a nationally recognized stress-relief program to help you meet your challenges so you can live a healthier life.

MU Extension’s Women in Dairy program is on its debut year.

“We home ladies will be able to take time get off the farm to enjoy a nice lunch this month to learn ways to manage everyday farm stress” said Bluel.

Register by calling the Wright County Extension office at (417) 547-7545. Admission of $10 can be paid at the door.

For more information, contact Reagan Bluel, 417-847-3161 or Ted Probert, 417-547-7545.
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